Tag Archives: Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club

Tour of Britain, Continuous Line, new version by Mick Burton. Inspired by Tour de Yorkshire 2019.

Tour of Britain, new continuous line drawing by Mick Burton. Inspired by Tour de Yorkshire 2019.

The Tour de Yorkshire annual cycle race has become a fixture in the Yorkshire calendar, but can be disruptive to other events or day trips we may plan.

Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club’s exhibition, intended to take place on Early May Bank holiday, was moved this year to Spring Bank Holiday weekend 25-27 May 2019 due to the Tour de Yorkshire coming through Ripley, where we hold the exhibition, on Friday 3 May.

Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club Spring Art Show and Sale of Work, Ripley Town Hall, 25-27 May 2019.

My Tour of Britain drawing has a continuous line starting and ending in Yorkshire as well, but would take slightly longer than the 4 days of the Tour de Yorkshire and require some trips over water.

The Tour de Yorkshire passed Ripley Town Hall, where the Exhibition will be held this weekend, and the Television coverage did a feature on Ripley including aerial views of Ripley Castle and the family of Sir Thomas Ingilby our art club’s patron.

Ripley Town Hall.   Photo from Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club website   www.handnart.co.uk

That day’s stage, from Doncaster to Bedale, passed some other places which have a close connection to myself.  As well as passing Scholes Village Hall, near Leeds (where Joan and myself play table tennis on a Sunday morning), Harrogate (where I went to school and served as a Police Cadet) and Ripley (as above), into Ripon passing two road ends where I grew up in the 1950’s and it ended in Bedale where my mother’s family (Mace) were based from the early 1800’s.

Last year’s Tour de Yorkshire went through Bedale and the reception was so impressive that the organisers decided to finish a stage in the town this year.  Here is a photo from the 2018 race where the riders went over the railway level crossing from Bedale into Aiskew and on the left is Park House, the Mace family house from the 1920’s.

Tour de Yorkshire 2018 at level crossing from Bedale into Aiskew passing the Mace family Park House on the left.  Photo Northern Echo 2018.

Joan and myself had intended to visit my Aunty Vi Doyle, 98 years old and who’s first husband was my mother Brenda’s youngest brother Harry Mace, on Friday 3 May.  When I realised that the Tour was finishing in Bedale that day I knew that we would not be able to get any where near her house and so we went a few days earlier.  Vi’s health had been deteriorating for some months and she was distinctly weaker this time and did not eat much of her fish from Fishy Hall’s for the first time ever.

We found out about the exact route of the race which included going past Vi’s bungalow in South End at the start of the finishing straight and we told her she would here the cheering.

Joan and myself watched the end of that stage on the television and after passing Vi’s the riders went up the main street passing the top of Emgate, in sight of the Oddfellows Arms (now The Three Coopers) where my mother was born, and finished next to the house in North End where my parents had their first home.

The cheers of the crowd would be one of the last memories of Aunty Vi who sadly died peacefully this morning in her own home.

 

Colour Sequence Application to Continuous Line Drawings by Mick Burton – demonstration continued.

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Clyde the Elephant, single continuous line with colour sequence by Mick Burton.

This is the continuation post covering my demonstration and workshop at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club on 6 December 2018.

Here is a reminder of my marker pen attempt at a continuous line elephant.

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Demonstration of a Single Continuous Line Elephant, initial drawing, at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club by Mick Burton, on 6 December 2018.

At home later I followed the line/s around and found that there was more than one line and I needed to do one or two diversions to correct that.  As the pattern at the front of the neck has a sort of square which I needed to get rid of I used that region to also turn the drawing into a single line throughout.  With a bit of general smoothing of arcs all round I arrived at the following revised elephant.

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Revised single continuous line elephant.    Mick Burton, Leeds Artist.

The next stage was to apply my Colour Sequence to the lines, which I completed in the last few days.  The result is shown at the top of this post.

To explain the process I use, and how it works, I will briefly go through the illustrations which I used later on in the Demonstration at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club.

We start by drawing a winding line in an anticlockwise direction.

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Stage 1. Single line drawn anticlockwise.   Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Then, starting on an outside section of line, overdraw in red alternate sections of line.  This results in three different continuous line sections bounded by a red line.

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Stage 2. Overdraw in red missing alternate sections.   Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

We can now number all the areas to indicate where the colours in the sequence go.  Call the outside 0 and number through the sections to 5 in the middle.  You will see that each channel between red lines has alternately numbered areas.

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Stage 3. Number the areas in sequence from the outside (being 0) to the middle (being 5). Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

I have already decided on a sequence of colours to use, running from light tones to darker and from yellow to red.  First apply yellow and gold alternately throughout the outer corridor.

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Stage 4. Paint alternate colours within the outer corridor. Mick Burton explains Colour Sequence.

Paint in the next two colours from the sequence – orange (which looks reddish here) and red – alternately in the inner corridor.  You can see how the colours are lining up in natural sequence of tone and colour.

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Stage 5. Paint second set of alternate colours (orange, which looks reddish here, and red) in the next corridor.   Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Lastly, for our anticlockwise line we paint the central area (which has its own red line surrounding it).  The result is a simple set of sequences running from the outside to the middle.

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Stage 6. The last colour in the sequence (dark red) is added in the centre. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

As you will have realised, each loop going over earlier parts of the drawing adds a level, like overlapping shadows or leaves on a tree looking darker as they overlap.  The direction of darker tones of colour in the sequence reflects this.

In more complex drawings, however, the sequences of colours can change direction.  To show this we need to have a different single continuous line.

Start drawing your line with two loops from the lower left in an anticlockwise direction as before.  When you reach the upper left change to doing three loops in a clockwise direction and then go back to the start by a line running underneath.

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Stage 7. Start drawing your line from the lower left in an anticlockwise direction doing loops and when you reach the higher left change to clockwise loops running back to the right. Then finish clockwise running underneath to the start. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Here is confirmation of the directions of the line, anticlockwise and clockwise, and how they change and run back over earlier lines.  We now have a more complex drawing for colouring.

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Stage 8. Here is the completed single line with the directions shown – red for anticlockwise and blue for clockwise. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

By applying alternate overdraw in red we split the drawing into corridors which look a bit more complicated than the simple anticlockwise drawing we did earlier.

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Stage 9. Alternate overdraw in red splits the new drawing up into corridors for colouring. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

When we number the areas, starting at 0 on the outside as before, we have plus numbers at the top of the drawing but minus numbers appear in the lower corridor.  When we follow the natural sequence of numbers downwards from 2 through 1 and 0 we hit -1 and -2.

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Stage 10. Numbering from 0 on the outside as before we get minus numbers as well as plus. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

After I had been doing my colour sequence for a few years I found out that mathematicians call this mix of anti and clock directions Winding Number Theory.  When you continue with loops in an anticlockwise direction you are adding levels of overlap and when you change to clockwise you start reducing levels.

We can now apply alternate colours yellow and red to the upper channel.

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Stage 11. First set of alternate colours in the upper channel on the complex drawing. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Then we can complete the positive colour direction.

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Stage 12.  Completing the plus direction colours by adding dark red.   Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

Now looking at the lower colours, in the clockwise section of the drawing we add the final two colours alternately.

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Stage 13.  Complete colour sequence on single continuous line drawn in both anticlockwise and clockwise directions. Mick Burton, Leeds artist.

So that is the basis of how I do my colour sequence.  

For my elephant, it is more complicated and I show below my sketch after doing the alternate overdraws to create the corridors of alternate colours and then numbered the colours throughout.

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Single continuous line elephant showing alternate overdrawn lines in red and colour numbering. The key to the colour sequence and numbering is shown. Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

I have shown the key to the colour sequence and numbering in the top right corner.  The colours can be employed in the opposite direction, of course, but with all my drawings the choice of which direction of sequence to adopt is not too difficult.  The darker colours fall lower down or on the main body of the animal and the more delicate red, orange and yellow mostly on the face. 

I only use red once, and that is on the eye.  This really reflects the greater detail on a face which extends the colour range.  Several of my colour sequence animals have the eye coloured by an end of range colour only used once in the drawing, eg. Iguana, Harriet the Hen and Olympic Lion.

The completed elephant, at the top of the post, has a story behind it.  I did the initial drawing in my demonstration to Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club on 6 December 2018, which is the day my first grandson, Lucas, was born in Glasgow, son of Kate and Mark. 

I have decided to call the elephant Clyde after the famous Glasgow river.  Lucas can have a picture on his wall which is exactly as old as he is.    

Demonstration and Workshop at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club by Mick Burton, Continuous Line Artist

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Mick Burton explains how alternate shading can be used to colour a completed single continuous line.  This is Dottie, a lurcher pointer cross.   Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club, December 2018.  Photo by Chris Noble.

As a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club I was delighted to run a workshop in December 2018 to demonstrate how I do my Single Continuous Lines and here I explain (above) how black and white alternate shading was applied to Dottie at the request of her owners.

Here is a photo of Dottie (below) checking out her portrait.

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This is Dottie checking out her portrait, done in Single Continuous Line with alternate shading by Mick Burton.  Photo by Stuart Firth.

I explained what my approach was to drawing Single Continuous Lines.  People often assume that I start at one point and draw the line, depicting my subject, all in one go and finish where I started.  I have done this from time to time, and my cat drawing is an example, but I now complete all my drawings in sections and then gradually connect up all the loose ends.

One of the more enjoyable parts of doing continuous lines is the freedom to incorporate all sorts of patterns involving curves, loops, sharp corners, etc.  In my case doodling these patterns was first triggered when I saw examples of Art Nouveau when I was about 9 years old.   I now drew some examples for the members and asked them to have a practice.

I then explained my approach to drawing an animal.  After doing a very basic sketch of my subject, I put in key marks throughout and then start on one section, such as the head.  Next I will initiate other parts such as legs and other distinctive features before connecting up all the lines.  I do not worry at this stage if there is more than one continuous line throughout, or that the lines may appear to be crudely drawn.

I said that I would demonstrate this approach by drawing an elephant, a subject which I have not attempted for about 50 years.

The result is shown below.  At home I usually start by using pencil on A4 size paper so that I can change the line as I go on.  The result can be scanned into my computer so that I can scale up to any size using Excel.  For Dottie, above, scaling up resulted in printing off 10 A4 sheets to stick together so that I could then trace through onto a big canvas.

For demonstrations I use a thick marker pen, usually on to A2 size paper but as there is a large screen at this club I used A3 size paper.  Poor quality paper is alright as the marker moves more smoothly, but of course a slightly shaking hand is magnified on the big screen.

It is important to keep an eye on loose ends.  I realised that I had three at one stage and was struggling to see the fourth, but a member spotted it on the big screen.  It was not too far away and I could link it back in without making the lines look too congested.

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Demonstration of a Single Continuous Line Elephant, initial drawing, at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club by Mick Burton, December 2018.

I said that this was fine as an example and the members could now have a go at any subject they wanted.  Also not to worry too much about loose ends or not being able to keep the lines clean.  Part of my aim was to introduce elements that could be incorporated into their own work and to encourage people to develop patterns or techniques of their own.

Regarding my elephant, I said that I would smarten it up later at home, by making sure that there was only one continuous line, smooth out the curves, etc and show them the result at a later meeting.  Also, I would produce a coloured version at home to link in with my intention to explain my colours later in the current session.

I was pleased with the drawings the members produced and enjoyed going round discussing their progress.  Here are a few examples of their lines, continuous or otherwise, including some colouring (which I did not start to cover until after these drawings).

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Kingfisher continuous line by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club, December 2018. Photo Mick Burton.

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Dolphin continuous line by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club, December 2018. Photo Mick Burton.

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Butterfly continuous line by member of Harroagate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton

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Runners continuous lines by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Rhino continuous line by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton

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Horse continuous line by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Pig continuous line by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton

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Dog continuous line by a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Pigs continuous lines by a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Teddy continuous line, done on a laptop, by a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Hen continuous line by a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Lady continuous line by a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Cat continuous line, with colour, by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Abstract continuous line, with some colour, by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Abstract continuous line, with overs and unders, by a member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

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Abstract continuous line, with red alternate shading, by member of Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo Mick Burton.

Whilst members were continuing with their continuous line drawings I talked about the backgrounds that I had gradually introduced into my pictures to add to the overall composition including my continuous lines.

Rather than simply have a plain background I have added to many paintings a simple coloured pattern effect which I feel complements the individual composition.  One example is a layered graduation of colours for my Single Continuous Line of a pig with my colour sequence.  I call the picture “Pig with Rasher Sky”.

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Mick Burton explaining his layered background to his painting “Pig with Rasher Sky” at his demonstration and workshop at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club. Photo by Chris Noble.

Another background is in my “Stained Glass Window Horse” which appears below.  Having spent considerable time in Ripon Cathedral when young I was always impressed by stained glass windows.  I also read a lot of Dandy comics where Desperate Dan sometimes jumped through a brick wall, “into the middle of next week”.  Consequently the horse has a gap in the wall similar to its outline and I have not included any cement and so that the sun shines through the gaps in the stones as well as the glass.  I chose a canvas where the sun can shine through as well.

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Mick Burton explains the stone wall effect as background to his painting “Stained Glass Horse” during workshop at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club, December 2018. Photo Chris Noble.

Later in the session I explained how my colours are devised and applied and I will cover this in a further post soon, which will also include the finished version of my new elephant and how my colour sequence naturally applies to it (hopefully).      

 

 

Rhinoceros and Ostrich continuous line drawings

Rhinoceros, continuous line drawing with colour sequence.  Based on Mick Burton demonstration.

Rhinoceros, single continuous line drawing with colour sequence. Based on Mick Burton demonstration.

I did a demonstration and workshop at Horsforth Arts Society, in Leeds, in January 2015.  It was a freezing evening and I parked outside in a narrow back street.  This club is an end terrace house, extended into the next house I think, and they have sole use.  No one had arrived, but I was encouraged by a notice in the window “Demonstration of Continuous Line Drawing by Mick Burton at 7.30pm”.  Shirley, who arranged demonstrations, arrived but could not unlock the door.  I managed to open it.

So we were in and I could cart all my kit and pictures up the stairs and decide on my set up.  Joan came with me to help and the room soon filled up with friendly, expectant, members.  Shirley had seen me demonstrate at another club and gave an encouraging introduction.

After showing several pictures of my animals, mentioning a bit about my past and going through the basics of how to do a continuous line animal, it was time to do my first drawing before the members had a go themselves.

Firstly I put my key marks on a sketched Rhinoceros, showed how to join up the marks in the main areas such as the head and legs and asked the members to start on their own subjects whilst I connected up more lines.  I completed a rough and ready version of the Rhino, which a few weeks later I spruced up and added colours as above.  It is in the Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club spring exhibition this weekend.

The members of the club completed pictures of animals or people with lines, but with a great variety of styles.  I did not insist on complete continuous lines, as the main idea was that their drawings could flow, and many good results emerged.  Several coloured in their creations.

Whilst they continued with their pictures, or started new ones, in the second half I started an Ostrich.  I did the head and neck and put some key marks elsewhere and invited members to come up and have a go at parts of the ostrich with my thick marker pen.  Several did and we arrived at the result below.  It has about three different lines going and a few dead ends.  This is fine at an early stage of my continuous line drawings, before loose ends are then connected up and one continuous line arrived at along with modifications to pattern and smoothing.

Ostrich continuous line, demonstration drawing by Mick Burton, with the assistance of members of Horsforth Arts Society.  January 2015.

Ostrich single continuous line drawing, demonstration by Mick Burton, with the assistance of members of Horsforth Arts Society. January 2015.

I thanked them for their help and in later weeks produced the picture “Ostrich Egg” below.  It has two continuous lines, one of which is the coloured Egg.

Ostrich Egg, continuous lines.  Based on Mick Burton demonstration.

Ostrich Egg, single continuous line drawing. Based on Mick Burton demonstration at Horsforth Arts Society.

A black pen version of the Ostrich is currently in the Association of Animal Artists annual exhibition.

I quite like including eggs in pictures.  “Harriet’s Busy Day”, which now resides in Worcestershire, was a finalist in Britain’s Got Artists in July 2012.

Harriet's Busy day.  Continuous line with colour sequence.  Background based on eggs.  Mick Burton, 2012.

Harriet’s Busy day. Single continuous line drawing with colour sequence. Background based on eggs. Mick Burton, continuous line artist 2012.

 When I showed the Hen picture to my sister Wendy she said  “Why have you stuck all those eggs to the ceiling”.