Tag Archives: Harry Mace

Tour of Britain, Continuous Line, new version by Mick Burton. Inspired by Tour de Yorkshire 2019.

Tour of Britain, new continuous line drawing by Mick Burton. Inspired by Tour de Yorkshire 2019.

The Tour de Yorkshire annual cycle race has become a fixture in the Yorkshire calendar, but can be disruptive to other events or day trips we may plan.

Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club’s exhibition, intended to take place on Early May Bank holiday, was moved this year to Spring Bank Holiday weekend 25-27 May 2019 due to the Tour de Yorkshire coming through Ripley, where we hold the exhibition, on Friday 3 May.

Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club Spring Art Show and Sale of Work, Ripley Town Hall, 25-27 May 2019.

My Tour of Britain drawing has a continuous line starting and ending in Yorkshire as well, but would take slightly longer than the 4 days of the Tour de Yorkshire and require some trips over water.

The Tour de Yorkshire passed Ripley Town Hall, where the Exhibition will be held this weekend, and the Television coverage did a feature on Ripley including aerial views of Ripley Castle and the family of Sir Thomas Ingilby our art club’s patron.

Ripley Town Hall.   Photo from Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club website   www.handnart.co.uk

That day’s stage, from Doncaster to Bedale, passed some other places which have a close connection to myself.  As well as passing Scholes Village Hall, near Leeds (where Joan and myself play table tennis on a Sunday morning), Harrogate (where I went to school and served as a Police Cadet) and Ripley (as above), into Ripon passing two road ends where I grew up in the 1950’s and it ended in Bedale where my mother’s family (Mace) were based from the early 1800’s.

Last year’s Tour de Yorkshire went through Bedale and the reception was so impressive that the organisers decided to finish a stage in the town this year.  Here is a photo from the 2018 race where the riders went over the railway level crossing from Bedale into Aiskew and on the left is Park House, the Mace family house from the 1920’s.

Tour de Yorkshire 2018 at level crossing from Bedale into Aiskew passing the Mace family Park House on the left.  Photo Northern Echo 2018.

Joan and myself had intended to visit my Aunty Vi Doyle, 98 years old and who’s first husband was my mother Brenda’s youngest brother Harry Mace, on Friday 3 May.  When I realised that the Tour was finishing in Bedale that day I knew that we would not be able to get any where near her house and so we went a few days earlier.  Vi’s health had been deteriorating for some months and she was distinctly weaker this time and did not eat much of her fish from Fishy Hall’s for the first time ever.

We found out about the exact route of the race which included going past Vi’s bungalow in South End at the start of the finishing straight and we told her she would here the cheering.

Joan and myself watched the end of that stage on the television and after passing Vi’s the riders went up the main street passing the top of Emgate, in sight of the Oddfellows Arms (now The Three Coopers) where my mother was born, and finished next to the house in North End where my parents had their first home.

The cheers of the crowd would be one of the last memories of Aunty Vi who sadly died peacefully this morning in her own home.

 

Winding Number Theory and Continuous Line Drawing

 

Whirlpool in Space, or Petrol Poluted Puddle. Spherical continuous line with repeat colour sequence with Rainbow colours.  Mick Burton, Continuous Line, 1971.

Whirlpool in Space, or Petrol polluted Puddle. Spherical single continuous line drawing with repeat colour sequence with Rainbow colours. Mick Burton, Continuous Line, 1971.

This painting was one of two pictures hung at the Chelsea Painters Open Exhibition, held at the Chenil Galleries, Chelsea,1971.  I walked along the Kings Road looking for the gallery (I had submitted through and agency) and it was great to see the Whirlpool first in a window by the entrance.

The design was triggered by a browse through mathematics books in the library and coming across Winding Number Theory.  This used a continuous line and every time the line was drawn winding in a counter-clockwise direction a level was added and if you wound back in a clockwise direction a level was taken off.

So far, in my colour sequence numbering based upon Alternate Overdraw, I had not had a sequence of colours greater than about nine.  If I used the Winding Number method and continued to wind around counter-clockwise many times I could have a long colour sequence.  I went a bit mad with the Whirlpool, which was done on a spherical basis (allowing drawing out of one side of the paper and back in at the opposite side), and has a sequence of 20.

I did not simply go from light to dark over the whole 20 (the steps in shade between each colour would have been too small), but oscillated up and down with a smaller range of colours similar to a rainbow.  I had seen the rainbow effect produced by sunlight on petrol spilt on a puddle.

Alternate overdraw with colour sequence numbers.  Continuous Line, Mick Burton.

Alternate overdraw with colour sequence numbers. Continuous Line, Mick Burton.

To illustrate the difference between my Alternate Overdraw and the Winding Number, I start with the Alternate Overdraw in Red on the left.  As shown in earlier posts, each channel of areas between overdraws has two numbers alternately.  You move naturally up to a higher channel or down to a lower channel, through the red line and continue the numbering.

As before, you start with “0” on the outside and 0 can also appear within the drawing.

 

 

When we come to Winding Number allocation, we can use the same basic drawing with little arrows showing the direction it has been drawn.  It can be either direction of course, but I have chosen one which will match the result above.

Winding number allocation.  Continuous Line, Mick Burton.

Winding number allocation. Continuous Line, Mick Burton.

Starting at “0” for the outside, if we cross to another area through a counter-clockwise border for that area, it will be a level higher.  If we cross through a clockwise line we reach a lower area.

Here the + areas are of course higher levels and the (-) areas are lower.

The numbering matches the Alternate Overdraw illustration above.

 

 

Now, just to show the initial thrust of the drawing for the Whirlpool, with many levels, the next illustration shows a line spiralling from the centre outwards and I have shown just 13 winds.

Part of initial Winding Number spiral for Whirlpool  painting.  Mick Burton, continuous line.

Part of initial Winding Number spiral for the Whirlpool in Space painting.    Mick Burton, single continuous line drawing.

Then I have drawn a line from the centre of the spiral directly back to the bottom of the picture as the first phase of breaking up the spiral so that lots more areas start to  appear.  The next such phase is a meandering line near the top of the picture. 

As I have said, this is a shorter version than the one usd for the main Whirlpool in Space picture above.

Next I have decided that the direction of  the line will be counter-clockwise starting from the bottom of the spiral, so that the levels go up towards the centre.  The numbers have then been added.

On the original painting, which is 24″ x 20″, I used alternate overdraw to allocate the colours.  This was because I was used to using that method and I think it is better for an artist anyway.  The Winding Number theory was simply the inspiration for producing a sequence of 20 or more.

Now, to go off at a tangent, I am interested in other artists in the family who keep coming to light.  As part of my research into my mother’s family, the Mace’s from Bedale (from 1825) and much earlier from Cambridge, I have come across a book by Thomas Mace called “Musick’s Monument” published originally in 1676.  It was published again about six years ago.  Amongst his own illustrations within the book is this one of a spiral depicting his idea of God’s world.

 

“Mysterious Centre of All Mysterie…” in Musick’s Monument, by Thomas Mace, 1676. Continuous Line, Mick Burton.

 

Thomas was a famous composer of the 17th century, and craftsman who made lutes and viols, whose main job was a chorister at Trinity College, Cambridge.

To add to this “sort of” co-incidence, my Uncle Harry Mace from Bedale, North Yorkshire, was a joiner and builder.  When he retired he started to make old style instruments, such as viols, and sold them to a music shop in Leeds.  I am sure he did not know about Thomas of Cambridge.

Thomas was not too impressed with a relatively new instrument in his time, the violin.