Tag Archives: Mick Burton

The Sunbathing Foxes are back in Gledhow Valley.

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Two foxes sunbathing in my garden in Gledhow Valley on 15 February 2019.  Photo by Mick Burton, continuous line artist, Leeds, Yorkshire.

This burst of warm spring weather is bringing out the foxes just about every day. These two spent about 30 minutes wandering around, sitting and just relaxing.

Not too different to the painting which I did of a couple doing similar things a couple of years ago.

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My single continuous line painting of two foxes sunbathing a couple of years ago.   Mick Burton, continuous line artist, Leeds, Yorkshire.

The first time I saw foxes in Gledhow Valley was in the late 1970’s, when I lived near the middle of the valley and brought the dog to this end of the woods, above the Well House, and spotted a pair of cubs playing.

To see more animals go to the Friends of Gledhow Valley Woods website    http://www.fgvw.co.uk      .

Colour Sequence Application to Continuous Line Drawings by Mick Burton – demonstration continued.

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Clyde the Elephant, single continuous line with colour sequence by Mick Burton.

This is the continuation post covering my demonstration and workshop at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club on 6 December 2018.

Here is a reminder of my marker pen attempt at a continuous line elephant.

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Demonstration of a Single Continuous Line Elephant, initial drawing, at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club by Mick Burton, on 6 December 2018.

At home later I followed the line/s around and found that there was more than one line and I needed to do one or two diversions to correct that.  As the pattern at the front of the neck has a sort of square which I needed to get rid of I used that region to also turn the drawing into a single line throughout.  With a bit of general smoothing of arcs all round I arrived at the following revised elephant.

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Revised single continuous line elephant.    Mick Burton, Leeds Artist.

The next stage was to apply my Colour Sequence to the lines, which I completed in the last few days.  The result is shown at the top of this post.

To explain the process I use, and how it works, I will briefly go through the illustrations which I used later on in the Demonstration at Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club.

We start by drawing a winding line in an anticlockwise direction.

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Stage 1. Single line drawn anticlockwise.   Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Then, starting on an outside section of line, overdraw in red alternate sections of line.  This results in three different continuous line sections bounded by a red line.

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Stage 2. Overdraw in red missing alternate sections.   Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

We can now number all the areas to indicate where the colours in the sequence go.  Call the outside 0 and number through the sections to 5 in the middle.  You will see that each channel between red lines has alternately numbered areas.

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Stage 3. Number the areas in sequence from the outside (being 0) to the middle (being 5). Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

I have already decided on a sequence of colours to use, running from light tones to darker and from yellow to red.  First apply yellow and gold alternately throughout the outer corridor.

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Stage 4. Paint alternate colours within the outer corridor. Mick Burton explains Colour Sequence.

Paint in the next two colours from the sequence – orange (which looks reddish here) and red – alternately in the inner corridor.  You can see how the colours are lining up in natural sequence of tone and colour.

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Stage 5. Paint second set of alternate colours (orange, which looks reddish here, and red) in the next corridor.   Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Lastly, for our anticlockwise line we paint the central area (which has its own red line surrounding it).  The result is a simple set of sequences running from the outside to the middle.

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Stage 6. The last colour in the sequence (dark red) is added in the centre. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

As you will have realised, each loop going over earlier parts of the drawing adds a level, like overlapping shadows or leaves on a tree looking darker as they overlap.  The direction of darker tones of colour in the sequence reflects this.

In more complex drawings, however, the sequences of colours can change direction.  To show this we need to have a different single continuous line.

Start drawing your line with two loops from the lower left in an anticlockwise direction as before.  When you reach the upper left change to doing three loops in a clockwise direction and then go back to the start by a line running underneath.

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Stage 7. Start drawing your line from the lower left in an anticlockwise direction doing loops and when you reach the higher left change to clockwise loops running back to the right. Then finish clockwise running underneath to the start. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Here is confirmation of the directions of the line, anticlockwise and clockwise, and how they change and run back over earlier lines.  We now have a more complex drawing for colouring.

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Stage 8. Here is the completed single line with the directions shown – red for anticlockwise and blue for clockwise. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

By applying alternate overdraw in red we split the drawing into corridors which look a bit more complicated than the simple anticlockwise drawing we did earlier.

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Stage 9. Alternate overdraw in red splits the new drawing up into corridors for colouring. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

When we number the areas, starting at 0 on the outside as before, we have plus numbers at the top of the drawing but minus numbers appear in the lower corridor.  When we follow the natural sequence of numbers downwards from 2 through 1 and 0 we hit -1 and -2.

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Stage 10. Numbering from 0 on the outside as before we get minus numbers as well as plus. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

After I had been doing my colour sequence for a few years I found out that mathematicians call this mix of anti and clock directions Winding Number Theory.  When you continue with loops in an anticlockwise direction you are adding levels of overlap and when you change to clockwise you start reducing levels.

We can now apply alternate colours yellow and red to the upper channel.

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Stage 11. First set of alternate colours in the upper channel on the complex drawing. Mick Burton explains colour sequence.

Then we can complete the positive colour direction.

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Stage 12.  Completing the plus direction colours by adding dark red.   Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

Now looking at the lower colours, in the clockwise section of the drawing we add the final two colours alternately.

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Stage 13.  Complete colour sequence on single continuous line drawn in both anticlockwise and clockwise directions. Mick Burton, Leeds artist.

So that is the basis of how I do my colour sequence.  

For my elephant, it is more complicated and I show below my sketch after doing the alternate overdraws to create the corridors of alternate colours and then numbered the colours throughout.

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Single continuous line elephant showing alternate overdrawn lines in red and colour numbering. The key to the colour sequence and numbering is shown. Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

I have shown the key to the colour sequence and numbering in the top right corner.  The colours can be employed in the opposite direction, of course, but with all my drawings the choice of which direction of sequence to adopt is not too difficult.  The darker colours fall lower down or on the main body of the animal and the more delicate red, orange and yellow mostly on the face. 

I only use red once, and that is on the eye.  This really reflects the greater detail on a face which extends the colour range.  Several of my colour sequence animals have the eye coloured by an end of range colour only used once in the drawing, eg. Iguana, Harriet the Hen and Olympic Lion.

The completed elephant, at the top of the post, has a story behind it.  I did the initial drawing in my demonstration to Harrogate and Nidderdale Art Club on 6 December 2018, which is the day my first grandson, Lucas, was born in Glasgow, son of Kate and Mark. 

I have decided to call the elephant Clyde after the famous Glasgow river.  Lucas can have a picture on his wall which is exactly as old as he is.    

Christmas Tree Frost Image on Car Roof

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Christmas Tree frost image on car roof, with photograph darkened.   Mick Burton, continuous line artist, 24 December 2018.

I have noticed hard frost images before on our car parked overnight in the drive. The car is on a slope facing upwards towards the south and the frost pattern seems to emanate from the high point of the roof, which is towards the higher front end.

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Car with frost image on roof, parked facing south up hill, showing the centre of the pattern at the high point of the roof.   Mick Burton, continuous line artist, photo taken 24 December 2018.

Here is a closer view of the roof.

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View of the frosted over roof of the car, 24 December 2018.   Photo Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

The pattern on the roof of the car reminds me of the view from a plane when flying over the Alps.

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A closer view can be likened to the view when flying over the Alps.   Photo Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

A very close view shows the granules of frost making up the effect.  This is the apex of the car roof and I presume that periodic melting had occurred followed by new freezing.

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Granules of frost making up the image on the car roof.   Photo Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

As the sun hits the roof it highlights the pattern and eventually starts to melt the frost around its edges.   A pattern similar to a fir tree starts to emerge.   The melting starts from the high end establishing the bottom of the trunk of the tree and begins to form the outline of  the rest of the tree.

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As the sun increasingly hits the car roof it highlights the effect and also begins to melt around the edges.  Photo Mick Burton, continuous line artist.  

Making the photograph darker produces the effect shown at the top of this post.

I prefer to leave a bit of the car in the photo myself, but here is a view without the top of the car windows.

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Tree effect without showing any obvious part of the car.   Photo Mick Burton, continuous line artist.

 

I am fascinated by intricate decorative patterns appearing in nature.   Sometimes my Single Continuous Lines include a hint of this naturalness.

The Secret Art Project in St Gemma’s 2018 Art Festival

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“Loch Knares Monster” submitted to St Gemma’s 2018 Secret Art Project by Mick Burton, Continuous Line Artist.

As the open session for bidding on e-bay for the A5 size card paintings and drawings submitted to the St Gemma’s Secret Art Project has now closed, I am free to say which two pictures were submitted by me.  Of course, they are not single continuous lines.

The first one, above, is called “Loch Knares Monster”.  I used coloured pencils to produce delicate shades in the water and sky in contrast to the acrylic pen outline on the Serpent.

I have always been interested in the Loch Ness Monster, so what is wrong with turning the famous railway bridge in Knaresborough into a giant serpent.  My first attempt at the monster, years ago, was to add one to a mural of Venice which had been painted all over the bathroom wall of a house I shared with several others in Leeds in the late 1960’s.

Also an artist friend of mine, Bryn Glover, constructed a sculpture of “Nessie” from a motor cycle chain in 1969.  He worked at Leeds General Infirmary and once used a huge pair of forceps in a sculpture of a pelican.

There had to be a train in it, particularly a steam train, but I did not feel that my favourite engine “Mallard” would be appropriate.  See photograph below of Mallard crossing the Knaresborough bridge.

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“Mallard on Knaresborough Viaduct” in 1987. Photograph by Jo Turner (https://www.geograph.org.uk/profile/14389).

One day in the mid 1950’s, when I was on holiday staying with relatives, my cousin John Simmister and myself wandered into the railway sidings in Peterborough.  We saw Mallard, all be itself and so dirty that you could hardly tell that it was green. We climbed into the cab and talked about what it would be like to travel at 126 miles an hour and break the world steam record.

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“Mange 2 – Rail Root North” submitted to St Gemma’s 2018 Secret Art Project by Mick Burton, Continuous Line Artist.

“Mange 2 – Rail Root North” was coloured in acrylic and in a style which I hoped would be very different to my Knaresborough picture.

The HS2 railway project from London to Leeds and Manchester has been dragging on for years and I thought that I would compare that train to a streamlined pea pod.  My wife Joan comes from Wakefield, which is Rhubarb Triangle country, and as she is a vegetarian I thought she may appreciate the “jokes”.

Here is a clipping from this month’s Yorkshire Reporter, showing that HS2 is still big news.

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Yorkshire Reporter, November 2018, showing plans for Leeds Railway Station as part of the HS2 project.

Therasa May is one of the celebrities (including John Bishop and Kaiser Chiefs) who have agreed to submit a picture to the Secret Art Project, but there is probably no danger that people will think that she painted Mange 2.

 

St Gemma’s 40th Anniversary Arts Festival – 2018 Leeds Art Exhibition and Sale 2018

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Mick Burton, continuous line drawing artist, one of 40 artists selected to exhibit in the Leeds Art and Photography Exhibition 2018 as part of the St Gemma’s 40th Anniversary Arts Festival.

The 2018 Leeds Art and Photography Exhibition and Sale takes place on 26 – 29 October 2018 at The Grammar School at Leeds as part of the St Gemma’s 40th Anniversary Arts Festival.

Last year there were about 170 artists exhibiting about 900 pictures and photographs. However, as it is the 40th anniversary of the charity, they have decided to give the 40 artists who have sold the most pictures in recent years the option of submitting more pictures and to specify their own presentation across two stands.

I have been fortunate enough to be invited and look forward to the exhibition.

You can check out the details on the initial website

https://events.st-gemma.co.uk/events/leedsartfestival

This also shows pictures by over 30 artists from the 2017 exhibition, including my “Leeds Olympic Lion” above.

I have also entered the “Secret Art Project” where you draw or paint on a post card and all the entries are displayed anonymously.  During and for a week after the exhibition the display is on the internet so people can bid for the cards.  They publicise various celebrities who St Gemma’s have asked to enter a picture card to help inflate the bidding.

Of course, using my continuous line style would be a bit of a “give away” so I have used another approach.  All will be revealed in a post after the event.

Another Stainbeck Artist, single continuous line drawing.

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Another Stainbeck Artist, single continuous line drawing portrait.  Mick Burton continuous line blog, 2018.

For this latest single continuous line drawing, I have used my gap technique to emphasise the crossovers of the lines and thickened certain key crossovers to try and further increase the three dimensional effect.

You can compare the result with the gaps only technique that I used with my blue horse in 2012.

Horse, in Celtic style.

Horse in Celtic style, single continuous Line drawing. Mick Burton, 2012.

You can also compare the portrait (above), based upon a 10 minute sketch of Zina done at Stainbeck Arts Club in late 2017, with my first single continuous line portrait (below) based upon a sketch of Barrie done at Stainbeck in 2012.

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Stainbeck Artist, a Single Continuous Line Drawing from a 10 minute sketch. Mick Burton, 2012.

I have also used the combined gapping and selected thicker lines on the single continuous line drawing of the Iguana, originally created in 1971.  The colour sequence version of the Iguana being featured on my previous post in July 2018.

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Iguana, single continuous line drawing. I have used gaps and selected thicker lines to enhance 3D effect. Mick Burton, continuous line blog.

“Another Stainbeck Artist” and “Iguana” continuous line drawings will both be on show, along with several other drawings and paintings of mine, at the Stainbeck Arts Club annual exhibition on Saturday 1 September 2018.  See Pamela Cundall’s poster below.

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Stainbeck Arts Club annual exhibition, 1 September 2018 in Chapel Allerton Methodist Church, Leeds.  Part of the Chapel Allerton Arts Festival 2018.  Pamela Cundall poster.

Once more the club’s exhibition is part of the The Chapel Allerton Arts Festival.   The festival lasts from 27 August to 2 September 2018.

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Chapel Allerton Arts Festival 2018 – BannerGraphic18.  Mick Burton continuous line artist blog.

 

 

Updated WordPress Galleries for continuous line artist Mick Burton

071. 1971-10. Iguana. Colour sequence. Blue, green, yellow, red.

Iguana single continuous line drawing with colour sequence. Mick Burton, Leeds, Yorkshire, 1971.

At last I have got round to updating my galleries of both “New Work since 2012” and “Gallery 1965-74”.   Here one of the additions to my older ones – Iguana, which I did show in an early post in July 2014 but did not include in the Gallery.

I now have a fantastic gallery with a tiled format where every picture has been sized to fit and those in short related sequences seem to be logically placed as well.  Exactly what I needed and way beyond what I expected.

Do have a look.  You can click on any picture to see it in detail and then click on arrows to see the whole gallery in turn.