Monthly Archives: October 2014

Continuous line drawing at St Gemma’s Leeds Art Exhibition 2014

St Gemma's Leeds Art Exhibition.  Mick Burton continuous line.

St Gemma’s Leeds Art Exhibition. Mick Burton continuous line.

I have entered seven paintings in St Gemma’s Leeds Art Exhibition, which starts on Thursday 23 October 2014 at Leeds Grammar School.  There are over 800 pictures for sale.  I felt I had to put this in my continuous line blog.

I have entered in the previous 2 years since I started painting again and managed to sell work each time.  Its well worth a visit.  And its in aid of St Gemma’s Hospice.

Here are three of my paintings as a taster.  All are in acrylic on canvas.

 

 

Usain Bolt continuous line drawing.  Several colour sequences.  100 metre Olympic final at night.  Mick Burton, 2013.

Usain Bolt single continuous line drawing. Several colour sequences. 100 metre Olympic final at night. Mick Burton, 2013.

I have been a big fan of Usain Bolt and wanted to use my style to try to capture the dynamic speed and flowing movement of this great athlete.

As the race took place under floodlights, I have used a shimmering effect against the dark background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skelldale is totally drawn with one continuous line and various colour sequences have been used. Mick Burton, 2013.

Skelldale is totally drawn with one continuous line and various colour sequences have been used. Mick Burton, single continuous line artist 2013.

I was brought up in Ripon, a North Yorkshire small market town.  There are three rivers which virtually surround the place – the Laver, the Skell and the Ure  in order of increasing size.

I lived near to the Skell, and we sometimes would walk along it upstream to Fountains Abbey.  One of the local myths was that there was an ancient  tunnel from Ripon Cathedral to Fountains Abbey and we would discuss where the route might be.

Red Kites at Harewood, continuous line and colour sequence. Mick Burton, 2013.

Red Kites at Harewood, single continuous line drawing and colour sequence. Mick Burton, 2013.

Yesterday, on the bus back from Harrogate to Leeds, we approached Harewood Bank and saw the herd of deer in the park and above there were six red kites circling.  I have never seen that many at once. 

Since they were re-introduced near Harewood they have spread many miles and sometimes float above our house in Gledhow Valley in Leeds.

I had to try to capture this amazing bird with my continuous line and colour sequence.

 

 

 

Continuous Line Drawing Alternate Overdraw embedded image.

 

Abstract before Alternate Overdraw  embedded Dog appears.  Mick Burton, Continuous Line.
Abstract before Alternate Overdraw embedded Dog appears. Mick Burton, Single Continuous Line Drawing.

 

 

Here is an abstract Continuous Line Drawing which conceals an image of a dog.  Possibly you can see some clues as to where the outline of the dog is.  The idea is to carry out an Alternate Overdraw along the line throughout the picture which will produce the image of the dog.  Start the overdraw with the arc marked with chevrons.

After I developed Alternate Overdraw in 1970, which enabled me to allocate my colour sequence to continuous line drawings, other possibilities started to occur to me.  The first was that you could hide an image of an animal within what looked like a totally abstract continuous line drawing.

See below how the dog finally appears.  In fact it looks a bit like Ben, who we have been looking after this week.

Alternate Overdraw embedded dog appears.  Mick Burton, Continuous Line Drawing.

Alternate Overdraw embedded dog appears. Mick Burton, Single Continuous Line Drawing.

The start of the process was to sketch a simple dog outline and then , knowing that the outline had to include many crossing lines, I broke the outline down into short lines or arcs which were at an angle to each other.

Next, I needed to run lines through the dog, from various directions, which used these arcs.  For it to work, there had to be an odd number of arcs in each line which went across the dog, between each two outer arcs.  This was so that, after completion, when you drew an alternate overdraw across the dog, both arcs on the outline were overdrawn.  This would result in all the arcs around the outline being overdrawn, thus forming one loop of overdraw. 

Within the body of the dog, several overdraw loops were also formed.  Similarly in the background a number of overdrawn loops and inner loops resulted. 

Of course, trial and error is involved in connecting up all the loose ends (of the lines running through the dog) to achieve a single continuous line through the whole drawing.

Finally, having completed a continuous line, I needed to check that there were no obvious sections which would indicate that an animal was in there. 

I did one more embedded image in 1970 before moving on to other things.  This time, instead of making the abstract continuous line from flowing curves with no straight lines, I decided to use mostly straight lines and right angles.

Abstract before Alternate Overdraw embedded steam engine appears.  Mick Burton, Continuous Line Drawing.

Abstract before Alternate Overdraw embedded steam engine appears. Mick Burton, Single Continuous Line Drawing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This time I  was concealing a steam engine and the Alternate Overdraw result is shown below.

Alternate Overdraw embedded steam engine appears.  Mick Burton, Continuous Line Drawing.

Alternate Overdraw embedded steam engine appears. Mick Burton, Single Continuous Line Drawing.

 

 

 

 

As always with my various styles, I wonder who else may be using them  and whether they were in use long ago.